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Karen Barad's 'Queer Causation and the Ethics of Mattering' explores biomimicry as a springboard from which to consider the limits to which the human/nonhuman divide might be pushed. Barad skilfully interrogates the growing corporate mantra to 'innovate through nature', that is, to mimic nature's own bountiful creations ...
Not where he eats, but where he is eaten. A certain convocation of politic worms are e’en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet. We fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots. Your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service—two dishes but to one table. That’s the end.
Ilit Ferber situates Benjamin’s understanding of melancholy in the context of Freud’s influential distinction between mourning, which successfully works through the traumatic loss of the love-object to regain reality and libidinal desire, and melancholy, which remains self-destructively attached to the lost object, making it part of the subject’s obsessed ego, thus only exacerbating the initial trauma
Alexander Etkind fills this lacuna. His study is positioned at the crossroads of cultural studies and history. The author places mourning into the historical perspective by thoroughly tracing postcatastrophic memory as it is realized in art, films, literature, and the historical writings of the post-Stalin years. Illuminating, rigorous in its analysis, and stimulating, Warped Mourning draws on a wide range of theoretical models of memory expounded by Freud, Benjamin, and Derrida and presents an innovative theory of mourning grounded in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia.
As Barad demonstrates with descriptions of electrons and how they have troubled physicists to the point of being “normalized” and called “immoral,” these particles resist normative notions of physical contact; they are perverse.